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Olympics: Funding Success

Team GB’s record-breaking success at Rio was underpinned by nearly two decades of lottery funding from elite sports body, UK Sport. But how much did the historic success cost – and what was the average cost of each medal? Tom Walker reports

by Tom Walker, Leisure Media | Published in Sports Management Oct 2016 issue 127
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Mo Farah’s double gold at Rio (5,000m and 10,000m) made him the UK’s first track athlete to win three Olympic golds / Mike egerton / press association
Mo Farah’s double gold at Rio (5,000m and 10,000m) made him the UK’s first track athlete to win three Olympic golds/ Mike egerton / press association

Witnessing Team GB’s amazing successes at Rio this summer, it is easy to forget that it is only 20 years since the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games, where the team’s performance was described as one of the lowest points of British sport. A single gold medal meant that Great Britain finished a lowly 36th in the Atlanta medal table – below the likes of Kazakhstan, Ethiopia and Algeria. Quite a contrast to the 27 golds, which earned the team second place in the Rio medals table.

Team GB’s transformation from Olympic also-rans to having the “best high performance system in the world” in just two decades has been described as one of the great success stories of publicly-funded sport. Much of the credit for Team GB’s journey from Olympic obscurity to the summit of sporting excellence has been placed on elite sports quango UK Sport.

The body was established in January 1997 – in the aftermath of the disastrous Atlanta Games – and tasked with taking charge and improving high performance sport. Shortly after its launch, the organisation was given authorisation to distribute lottery money and in the two decades since then, UK Sport has created a system which is now envied around the sporting world.

OLYMPIC RAGS TO RICHES
It is estimated that the UK government was spending around £5m per year on Olympic sports prior to the 1996 Atlanta games – which is equivalent to having a £20m four-year “cycle” of funding.

Following the launch of UK Sport, the amount of funds invested in high performance sport nearly tripled for the next Olympic Games. In total, £58.9m of lottery funding was spent on elite sports between the setting up of UK Sport and the opening of the Sydney Olympic Games in 2000.

The increase in funding delivered immediate results in terms of sporting success. At Sydney, Team GB achieved 28 podium finishes and ranked 10th in the overall medal table – a position they achieved again at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens. Encouraged by the outcomes – and with the prospect of London hosting the 2012 Olympic Games – UK Sport began to set its sights even higher.

In December 2004 the quango announced that it would be overhauling the way it allocated funding in order to concentrate on those sports which would ensure even more medals at major Games. It was around this time that the term “no compromise” was added to the UK Sport lexicon.

“The new strategy is more focused than in the past,” then chair Sue Campbell said in November 2004. “The impact of funding will be diluted if too many athletes are supported. It is a tough, no compromise approach that will strengthen the best, support the developing and provoke change in the under performing.”

INCREASED FUNDING
While it tightened the criteria for funding in order to further improve results, there were two other key turning points which helped UK Sport establish its role as the guardian of elite sport funding. In July 2005, London won the bid to host the 2012 Games, strengthening the case for making more funds available to provide a strong Team GB for the home games.

Then, in April 2006, a decision to simplify the funding streams ahead of the London Games gave UK Sport responsibility for all performance-related funding – from talent programmes to podium athletes. Until that point, all talent identification, nurturing and development programmes had been the responsibility of the individual sports councils of the four home nations, with UK Sport solely concentrating on the funding of elite athletes.

This meant that the amount of Lottery Funding which UK Sport was responsible for radically increased. The quango had invested £71m during the Athens 2004 cycle, but taking over the development and talent level activities and programmes meant that for Beijing 2008, the amount of money being channelled by UK Sport exceeded £235m. For the London Games, the figure jumped to £264m.

SETTING THE BAR HIGH
In many ways, the London 2012 Games was a watershed moment for British elite sport. The unprecedented success of Team GB athletes inspired the whole nation and resulted in the government pledging increases both to Olympic (5 per cent increase) and Paralympic (43 per cent) funding, resulting in an overall increase of 11 per cent on the London 2012 cycle. In total, a record investment of £274m was made to support Team GB’s preparations for the Rio 2016 Olympics.

Following the changes, in December 2012, then UK Sport chair Baroness Sue Campbell said: “London 2012 was just the beginning, not the end, for Olympic and Paralympic sport in this country – and we plan to continue to make this funding work as hard as it can to help our best athletes achieve medal success at the highest level.”

The record investment was accompanied by an ambitious target – for Great Britain to become the first nation to be more successful in the Olympics post hosting, in terms of number of medals won. The bar was set high for Rio 2016, but so was the level of support in order to clear it.

TARGET PRACTICE
As we now know, Team GB smashed its medal target for the Rio 2016 Olympics and achieved its goal of becoming the first nation to surpass its home Games medal haul. In the process, Great Britain sensationally finished second in the medal table, above global powerhouse China. Of the 366 British athletes at Rio, more than a third (130) came back with a medal.

But what was the cost of each medal at Rio? Which sports have the “cheapest” medals and which require more funding in order to deliver success?

Shooting might not be the biggest sport, but when it comes to cost effective podium finishes, it is top of the bill. At Rio, two bronze medals came at a cost of £3.95m over the four-year cycle – meaning that each “cost” the equivalent of £1.98m.

The success of gymnasts, such as double Olympic champion Max Whitlock, not only means that they have become household names, but that funding in the sport can be seen as money well spent. At Rio, the gymnastics team exceeded its medal target of three to five by securing seven podium finishes. As the sport received £14.6m of during the cycle, it meant that each medal came at a cost of just £2.09m.

At the other end of the scale are hockey and sailing. The women’s hockey team’s victory at Rio might have been one of the highlights of the Games for fans, but success came at a cost. More than £16.1m was ploughed into the sport by UK Sport during the cycle, making the single gold the most expensive of all of Team GB’s medals. The hockey team does, however, consists of 16 players – each of whom receives individual funding – so when calculating average costs, there’s an argument to divide the cost among all 16.

Had the men’s hockey team finished in the top three, as expected, then sailing would have finished as the sport with the most expensive medals at Rio. A total of £25.5m was invested in sailing over the Rio Game cycle, but with three medals – at the lower end of UK Sport’s expectation of securing between three and six medals – the two golds and silver ended up costing £8.5m each.

There were also four sports into which UK Sport invested during the Rio cycle which failed to secure a medal. Out of these, modern pentathlon (medal target of 1 to 2) and  fencing (target of one medal) can be said to have underachieved, while archery and weightlifting had no medal targets for Rio – and delivered none.

SPORTING SUPERPOWER
Since its launch, UK Sport has poured a total of £1.138bn into setting up systems and supporting athletes – £904m of which has been invested in the Summer Olympics alone. It is almost impossible to argue that the organisation hasn’t achieved what it was set up to do – to radically improve Team GB’s performances on the world sports stage.

The details of the next cycle for Tokyo won’t be disclosed until early 2017, and it remains to be seen whether the UK will greenlight an increase in funding.

While the “cost” of medals isn’t among the criteria used by UK Sport to make its funding decisions, using it to compare sports does offer a way of assessing each sport’s efficiency. With the average price of a medal at Rio standing at £4,288,524m, sports such as gymnastics, taekwondo and cycling could point out that their medals cost significantly less.

Liz Nicholl, UK Sport chief executive, says Team GB’s success in Rio has ensured the team paved the way for future success at Tokyo. “We made sporting history with 67 medals across 19 sports,” she said. “To win more medals than in London and to be ahead of China is an incredible place to be – it’s spectacular in fact. Even the sporting superpowers have not increased their medal haul after hosting a Games. We are one of those sporting superpowers now.”

Total funding for Rio

Olympics £274,465,541
Paralympics £72,786,652

Summer sports £274,465,541
Archery £2,952,237
Athletics £26,824,206
Badminton £5,737,524
Boxing £13,764,437
Canoeing £20,043,618
Cycling £30,267,816
Diving £7,467,860
Equestrian £17,992,860
Fencing £4,225,261
Gymnastics £14,615,428
Hockey £16,141,393
Judo £7,366,200
Modern Pentathlon £6,972,174
Rowing £32,622,862
Sailing £25,504,055
Shooting £3,950,888
Swimming £20,795,828
Taekwondo £8,053,837
Triathlon £7,457,977
Weightlifting £1,709,340

Summer parasports £72,786,652
Boccia £3,663,781
Disability Shooting £3,407,444
Disability Table Tennis £3,006,850
Para-Archery £2,449,947
Para-Athletics £10,837,658
Para-Canoe £3,048,816
Para-cycling £6,833,000
Para-Equestrian Dressage £3,782,800
Para-Rowing £3,834,382
Para-Sailing £3,616,610
Para-swimming £11,756,218
Para-Triathlon £3,100,803
Powerlifting £891,444
VI Judo £2,019,874
Wheelchair Basketball £5,379,264
Wheelchair Fencing £194,886
Wheelchair Rugby £3,037,607
Wheelchair tennis £1,925,270

TEAM GB's record medal success in Rio

Team GB amassed 67 medals in total – two better than its London 2012 collection.

27 GOLD
Liam Heath solo kayak
Nicola Adams Boxing
Mo Farah Athletics 5,000m
Nick Skelton Equestrian
(eventing, showjumping)
Team GB hockey (women’s)
Alistair Brownlee Triathlon
Hannah Mills & Saskia Clark Sailing (470)
Jade Jones Taekwondo
Giles Scott sailing
Jason Kenny cycling (keirin)
Laura Trott cycling (omnium)
Charlotte Dujardin equestrian (dressage)
Justin Rose golf
Max Whitlock gymnastics (floor)
Max Whitlock gymnastics (pommel horse)
Jason Kenny cycling (sprint)
Andy Murray tennis
Mo Farah athletics (10,000m)
Team GB rowing (men’s eight)
Team GB cycling (team pursuit)
Helen Glover & Heather Stanning rowing (coxless pair)
Team GB rowing (coxless fours)
Team GB cycling (men’s team pursuit)
Team GB cycling (men’s team sprint)
Joe Clarke kayaking (K1)
Jack Laugher & Chris Mears diving
(men’s syncro 3m)
Adam Peaty swimming (100m breastroke)

23 SILVER

Joe Joyce Boxing
Lutalo Muhammad Taekwondo
Jonathan Brownlee Triathlon
Liam Heath & Jon Schofield Kayak (double)
Becky James cycling (sprint)
Jack Laugher diving
Mark Cavendish cycling (omnium)
Louis Smith gymnastics (pommel horse)
Nick Dempsey sailing (RS:X, windsurfing)
Callum Skinner cycling (sprint)
Team GB rowing (women’s eight)
Jessica Ennis-Hill athletics (heptathlon)
Becky James cycling (keirin)
Team GB swimming
(men’s 4x100 medley relay)
Jazz Carlin swimming (800m freestyle)
Bryony Page gymnastics (trampolining)
Team GB equestrian (team dressage)
David Florence & Richard Hounslow canoeing (C2)
Katherine Grainger & Vicky Thornley rowing (women’s double sculls)
Team GB rugby sevens (men)
Team GB swimming
(men’s 4x200m freestyle relay)
Siobhan-Marie O’Connor swimming
(200m medley)
Jazz Carlin swimming
(400m freestyle)

17 BRONZE

Olympics golden couple Laura Trott and Jason Kenny dominated their cycling events in Rio
Olympics golden couple Laura Trott and Jason Kenny dominated their cycling events in Rio
Vicky Holland Triathlon
Bianca Walkden Taekwondo
Team GB Athletics (women’s 4x400m)
Team GB Athletics (men’s 4x100m relay)
Marcus Ellis & Chris Langridge Badminton
Amy Tinkler gymnastics (floor)
Nile Wilson gymnastics (horizontal bar)
Katy Marchant cycling (sprint)
Joshua Buatsi boxing
Sophie HItchon hammer
Greg Rutherford athletics (long jump)
Sally Conway judo
Chris Froome cycling (road race)
Steven Scott shooting (double trap)
Max Whitlock gymnastics (all-round)
Tom Daley & Dan Goodfellow diving (syncro 10m)
Ed Ling shooting (men’s trap)

Upping the game

UK Sport’s Olympic funding cycles

Sydney 2000 £58.9m
Athens 2004 £71m
Beijing 2008 £235.1m
London 2012 £264.1m
Rio 2016 £274.5m

* Figures for the Sydney and Athens Olympiads relate to podium level funding only –  UK Sport became responsible for all performance funding – from talent development to podium athletes – in April 2006.

Average cost of medal for each sport

Total average for each UK Sport funded medal: £4,288,524

Hockey £16,141,393
Sailing £8,501,351
Judo £7,366,200
Rowing £6,524,572
Equestrian £5,997,620
Badminton £5,737,524
Canoeing £5,010,904
Boxing £4,588,145
Athletics £3,832,029
Swimming £3,465,971
Taekwondo £2,684,612
Cycling £2,522,318
Triathlon £2,485,992
Diving £2,489,286
Gymnastics £2,087,918
Shooting £1,975,444

UK Sport spent £15,859,012 of funding on Olympic sports which didn’t achieve medals at Rio

Modern pentathlon£6,972,174
Fencing £4,225,261
Archery £2,952,237
Weightlifting £1,709,340

Non-funded sports
Golf - 1 gold
Tennis - 1 gold
Rugby - 1 silver

Archery

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £2,952,237 - 0 medals

Target medals: 0
Avg. Cost per medal: N/A
London total £4,408,000
Beijing total £2,834,000

Team GB sent two archers (Patrick Huston and Naomi Folkard) to Rio 2016. Neither medalled.

Sport England’s elite funding:
Sport England announced its largest ever investment in archery for the 2013-17 cycle – with £2m given to Archery GB to continue to develop the sport. Of that total, £750,000 was set aside specifically for talent development.

Athletics

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £26,824,206 - 7 Medals

Target medals: 0
Avg. Cost per medal: £3,832,029

London total £25,148,000
Beijing total £26,513,000

Gold:
1. Mo Farah - Athletics 5,000m
2. Mo Farah - Athletics 10,000m

Silver:
1. Jessica Ennis-Hill - Athletics (Heptathlon)

Bronze:
1. Team GB - Athletics (women’s 4x400m)
2. Team GB - Athletics (men’s 4x100m relay)
3. Sophie HItchon - Hammer
4. Greg Rutherford - Athletics (Long jump)

Sport England’s elite funding:
Athletics was handed a £22m legacy investment pot from Sport England to get more people to take up the sport – one of the largest single funding awards of the cycle.

Badminton

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - Badminton £5,737,524 - 1 Medal

Target medals: 0-1
Avg. Cost per medal: £5,737,524

London total £7,434,900
Beijing total £8,759,000

Bronze:
Marcus Ellis & Chris Langridge - Badminton

Sport England’s elite funding:
Badminton received £18m during the cycle, with £3m earmarked for talent development. The funding will see Badminton England offer 1,750 prospects opportunities to take part in high-quality coaching at Performances Centres around the country. The very best of these young players can look forward to intensive support at the England Junior Academy, as they work to achieve their Olympic ambitions.

Boxing

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £13,764,437 - 3 medals

Target medals: 3-5
Avg. Cost per medal: £4,588,145

London total £9,551,400
Beijing total £5,005,000

Gold:
Nicola Adams - Boxing

Silver:
Joe Joyce - Boxing

Bronze:
Joshua Buatsi - boxing

Sport England’s elite funding:
Out of the total £5.8m funding pot, the Amateur Boxing Association of England was tasked with directing £1.2m to support talent pathways and produce the next generation of Olympians during the cycle.

GB Gold medallist Nicola Adams in action against France’s Sarah Ourahmoune. The average GB medal cost for boxing was £4.5m / owen humphreys / press association
GB Gold medallist Nicola Adams in action against France’s Sarah Ourahmoune. The average GB medal cost for boxing was £4.5m/ owen humphreys / press association

Cycling

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £30,267,816 - 12 medals

Target medals: 8-10
Avg. Cost per medal: £2,522,318

London total £26,032,000
Beijing total £22,151,000

Gold:
1. Jason Kenny - cycling (keirin)
2. Laura Trott - cycling (omnium)
3. Jason Kenny - cycling (sprint)
4. Team GB - cycling (team pursuit)
5. Team GB - cycling (men’s team pursuit)
6. Team GB - cycling (men’s team sprint)

Silver:
1. Becky James - cycling (sprint)
2. Mark Cavendish - cycling (omnium)
3. Callum Skinner - cycling (sprint)
4. Becky James - cycling (keirin)

Bronze:
1. Katy Marchant - cycling (sprint)
2. Chris Froome - cycling (road race)

Sport England’s elite funding:
Cycling is another sport which received a record level of Sport England funding during the cycle. From the total £32m, £6.4m will be directed to talent development and help identify and grow future Olympians.

Jason Kenny holds a total of six Olympic gold medals, equalling the record by Chris Hoy
Jason Kenny holds a total of six Olympic gold medals, equalling the record by Chris Hoy

Diving

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £7,467,860 - 3 medals

Target medals: 1-2
Avg. Cost per medal: £2,489,287

London total £4,408,000
Beijing total £2,834,000

Gold:
Jack Laugher & Chris Mears - diving
(men’s syncro 3m)

Silver:
Jack Laugher - diving

Bronze:
Tom Daley & Dan Goodfellow - diving
(syncro 10m)

Sport England’s elite funding:
Grassroots and talent funding is linked to the overall funding for swimming.

Equestrian

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £17,992,860 - 3 medals

Target medals: 2-4
Avg. Cost per medal £5,997,620

Beijing total £11,727,000
London total £13,395,100

Gold:
1. Nick Skelton - Equestrian
(eventing, showjumping)
2. Charlotte Dujardin - equestrian (dressage)

Silver:
Team GB - equestrian (team dressage)

Sport England’s elite funding:
From a total £6m funding pot, £1.1m has been earmarked for talented riders in each of the four equestrian disciplines. British Equestrian Federation’s focus has been on enhancing coaching and coach succession, helping talented disabled and non-disabled riders get on elite programmes, and developing competitions.

Team GB won two golds and one silver in the Equestrian event (around £6m a medal) / david davies / press association
Team GB won two golds and one silver in the Equestrian event (around £6m a medal)/ david davies / press association

Gymnastics

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £14,615,428 - 7 medals

Target medals: 3-5
Avg. Cost per medal: £2,087,918

Beijing total £9,036,000
London total £10,770,600

Gold:
1. Max Whitlock - gymnastics (floor)
2. Max Whitlock - gymnastics (pommel horse)

Silver:
1. Louis Smith - gymnastics (pommel horse)
2. Bryony Page - gymnastics (trampolining)

Bronze:
1. Amy Tinkler - gymnastics (floor)
2. Nile Wilson - gymnastics (horizontal bar)
3. Max Whitlock - gymnastics (all-round)

Sport England’s elite funding:
The total funding pot for the sport is £11.78m, which includes a £1m investment in talent development. This programme includes the appointment of 10 regional co-ordinators and increased competition opportunities for talented gymnasts just below the world class performance programme level.

Max Whitlock achieved double Olympic gold success in Rio in 
the gymnastic events / USA TODAY sports / press association
Max Whitlock achieved double Olympic gold success in Rio in the gymnastic events/ USA TODAY sports / press association

Hockey

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £16,141,393 - 1 medal

Target medals: 1-2
Avg. Cost per medal: £16,141,393

Beijing total £9,882,000
London total £15,013,200

Gold:
Team GB - (women’s)

Sport England’s elite funding:
£12m during the cycle, with £2.1m being ploughed into talent development

Fencing

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £4,225,261 - 0 medals

Target medals: 0-1
Avg. Cost per medal N/A

Beijing total £3,074,000
London total £2,529,000

Team GB sent three fencers to Rio, with Richard Kruse coming closest to a medal, losing his bronze medal match to the Russian Timur Safin and finishing fourth.

Sport England’s elite funding:
British Fencing is one of the national governing bodies which had to undertake actions to ensure Sport England didn’t cut off its funding in the current cycle. After “significant improvements” to its governance and a “more customer-focused approach” to attract new people into the sport, the NGB in 2014 secured £1.33m worth of funding – which included an increased investment in talent of £750,000 over three years.

Judo

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 -£7,366,200 - 1 medal

Target medals: 0-1
Avg. Cost per medal: £7,366,200

Beijing total £6,947,000
London total £7,498,000

Bronze:
Sally Conway - judo

Sport England’s elite funding:
Total investment during the funding will be £6.1m, of which £1.5m has been made available for British Judo Association’s talent development programme.

Modern Pentathlon

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £6,972,174 - 0 medals

Target medals: 1-2
Avg. Cost per medal: N/A

Beijing total £5,920,000
London total £6,288,000

Team GB sent four athletes to Rio 2016 and none came back with anything other than top 10 finishes – the best being Kate French who finished sixth.

Sport England’s elite funding:
Two thirds (£600,000) of the £900,000 funding given to Pentathlon GB has gone towards developing the talent pathway.

Sailing

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £25,504,055 - 3 medals

Target medals: 3-6
Avg. Cost per medal: £8,501,351

Beijing total £22,292,000
London total £22,942,700

Gold:
1. Hannah Mills & Saskia Clark - Sailing (470)
2. Giles Scott - sailing

Silver:
1. Nick Dempsey - sailing (RS:X, windsurfing)

Sport England’s elite funding:
Royal Yachting Association will receive £9.3m during the current cycle, with £3.5m going to support the development of young talented sailors.

Helen Glover (left) and Heather Stanning (right) took gold for GB 
in the rowing (coxless pairs) / jack gruber / USA TODAY sports / press association
Helen Glover (left) and Heather Stanning (right) took gold for GB in the rowing (coxless pairs)/ jack gruber / USA TODAY sports / press association

Shooting

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £3,950,888 - 2 medals

Target medals: 1-2
Avg. Cost per medal: £1,975,444

Beijing total £5,056,000
London total £2,461,866

Bronze:
1. Steven Scott - shooting (double trap)
2. Ed Ling - shooting (men’s trap)

Sport England’s elite funding:
£1m over the current cycle – with £220,000 going into talent programmes.

Swimming

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £20,795,828 - 6 medals

Target medals: 3-5
Avg. Cost per medal: £3,465,971

Beijing total £20,659,000
London total £25,144,600

Gold:
Adam Peaty - swimming (100m breastroke)

Silver:
1. Team GB - swimming (men’s 4x100 medley relay)
2. Jazz Carlin - swimming (800m freestyle)
3. Team GB - swimming (men’s 4x200m freestyle relay)
4. Siobhan-Marie O’Connor - swimming (200m medley)
5. Jazz Carlin - swimming (400m freestyle)

Sport England’s elite funding:
While the Amateur Swimming Association (ASA) had to meet conditions to secure Sport England funding for its grassroots and participation programmes during this cycle, its talent funding was unaffected. In total, the NGB received £6m over the four years to support talented athletes across the five aquatic disciplines (swimming, diving, disability swimming, synchronised swimming and water polo).

The ASA received £6m over the four-year cycle to support talented athletes across five disciplines / rob schumancher /USA TODAY sports PA
The ASA received £6m over the four-year cycle to support talented athletes across five disciplines/ rob schumancher /USA TODAY sports PA

Taekwondo

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £8,053,837 - 3 medals

Target medals: 1-3
Avg. Cost per medal: £2,684,612

Beijing total £2,667,000
London total £4,833,600

Gold:
Jade Jones - Taekwondo

Silver:
Lutalo Muhammad - Taekwondo

Bronze:
Bianca Walkden - Taekwondo

Sport England’s elite funding:
In total, GB Taekwondo received £1.2m during 2013-17 – all of which went into talent programmes.

Triathlon

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £7,457,977 - 3 medals

Target medals: 2-3
Avg. Cost per medal: £2,485,992

Beijing total £5,113,000
London total £5,291,300

Gold:
Alistair Brownlee - (men’s)

Silver:
Jonathan Brownlee - (men’s)

Bronze:
Vicky Holland - (women’s)

Sport England’s elite funding:
In total, Triathlon England was awarded £7.5m for the cycle. Of this, £2.2m will fund talent development; including a new paratriathlon talent support programme after the sport was included in the 2016 Paralympic Games.

Weightlifting

TOTAL SPENT: Rio 2016 - £1,709,340 - 0 medals

Target medals: 0
Avg. Cost per medal: N/A

Beijing total £1,686,000
London total £1,365,157

Team GB sent two weightlifters to Rio (Sonny Webster and Rebekah Tiler). Neither medalled.

Sport England’s elite funding:
The sport was given £1.03m for the cycle. Traditionally, most of the funding has been for the development of competitive Olympic weightlifting and Paralympic powerlifting.

Non-funded sports which achieved medals

Golf: Justin Rose - (men’s)
Sport England’s elite funding:
Sport England has invested £13m into the England Golf Partnership in the current cycle, with £3.3m being used to develop talent across the sport and fund an expansion of the County Academy Programme.

Tennis: Andy Murray - (men’s)
Sport England’s elite funding:
Tennis has had its grassroots funding reviewed during the cycle and has had to meet conditions to keep its £17.4m funding going – but its talent funding has remained the same. In total, the Lawn Tennis Association has been given £3.75m to support talented players over the four-year period.

Rugby:
Team GB - rugby sevens (men’s)

Andy Murray won gold in Rio – while the LTA received £3.7m to support GB talent / owen humphreys /PA
Andy Murray won gold in Rio – while the LTA received £3.7m to support GB talent/ owen humphreys /PA

Olympic sports with no Team GB at Rio

Beach Volleyball
Football
Handball
Volleyball
Water Polo

Non-funded sports present at Rio

Table Tennis
UK Sport cut all funding to table tennis following the London 2012 Games. Paul Drinkhall made it to Round 4 in singles while the men’s team made it to the quarter finals.

Around 70 per cent of UK Sport’s funding is invested through two channels. One is to national governing bodies of sport (NGBs) – enabling them to operate world class programmes – and the other is direct athlete funding in the shape of Athlete Performance Awards (APA). The APA, solely funded by National Lottery income, is paid directly to the athletes and contributes to their living and sporting costs.

Since its launch, UK Sport has poured a total of £1.138bn into setting up systems and supporting athletes – £904m of which has been invested in Summer Olympics alone.

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Recreation Assistant (Lifeguard)

GLL
Salary: Up to £19,775 per annum (39 hours pro rata)
Location: Cambridge, UK

Recreation Assistant (Lifeguard)

GLL
Salary: Up to £18,305 per annum
Location: Preston, UK

General Manager

The Gym Group
Salary: Competitive salary plus benefits
Location: London, England, UK

Recreation Assistant (Lifeguard)

GLL
Salary: Up to £18,305 per annum
Location: Reading, UK

Recreation Assistant (Lifeguard)

GLL
Salary: Up to £16,696 per annum
Location: Swindon, UK
recruiting with sports management

Catering Supervisor

GLL
Salary: Up To £17,977 PA
Location: Swindon, UK

Sales Manager

Lex Leisure
Salary: 25,000 per annum (plus OTE)
Location: Bexleyheath, UK

Duty Manager

GLL
Salary: Up to £22,930 PA
Location: Chingford, London, UK

Duty Manager

GLL
Salary: Up to £22,930 PA
Location: Preston, UK

Duty Manager

GLL
Salary: Up to £22,930 PA
Location: Manchester, UK

Duty Manager

GLL
Salary: Up to £22,930 PA
Location: Teversham, Cambridge, UK

Senior Recreation Assistant

New Hall School
Salary: £9.02ph - £10.76ph
Location: Boreham, Chelmsford, UK
recruiting with sports management

Assistant Manager

GLL
Salary: Up To £34,966 PA
Location: Epsom, UK

Health and Fitness Supervisor

GLL
Salary: Up To £23,894 PA
Location: Finchley, London, UK

General Manager

GLL
Salary: Up To £31,251 PA
Location: Bradford, UK

Fitness Class Instructors

Anglia Ruskin University
Salary: Hourly paid upon submission of claims
Location: Chelmsford, UK

Swimming Teacher

Circadian Leisure Trust
Salary: £10.96 - £13.24 per hour
Location: Yate, Bristol, UK

Duty Manager

GLL
Salary: Up To £25,655 PA
Location: London, UK

Recreation Assistant (Lifeguard)

GLL
Salary: Up to £9.00 per hour
Location: Belfast, UK
training with sports management

Recreation Assistant (Lifeguard)

GLL
Salary: Up to £18,305 per annum
Location: Cambridge, UK

Recreation Assistant (Lifeguard)

GLL
Salary: Up to £18,305 per annum
Location: Amersham, UK

Assistant General Manager

The Gym Group
Salary: Competitive salary plus benefits
Location: Telford, UK

Team Leader

Everyone Active
Salary: Competitive Salary
Location: Bristol, UK

Swim Manager

Everyone Active
Salary: Competitive Rates
Location: Alton, UK

Duty Manager

Mytime Active
Salary: £20,000 - £25,000 per annum
Location: Bromley, UK

Recreation Assistant / Lifeguard

Mytime Active
Salary: £17,076.80 per annum pro rata
Location: Bromley, UK
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Wattbike
The choice of the elite. Wattbike introduced the first true indoor bike in 2008, changing indoor cycling forever. Developed in association with world class coaches and athletes, and now chosen by the world’s premier health clubs, cycling studios, and personal trainers as well as universities, the military, and countless athletes and coaches across the world, Wattbike has truly revolutionised indoor cycling. Want to join our revolution? Power up your business with Wattbike.
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Company profile

Company profile: Rubb Buildings Ltd
Rubb Buildings Ltd designs and manufactures relocatable, semi-permanent and permanent fabric engineered specialist sports buildings.
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CIMSPA Youth Panel to give real insight into Gen Z at active-net 2020
It’s just months away until active-net 2020, the two-day educational, networking and business meetings event, which attracts professionals from across the leisure sector.
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Diary dates

21-23 Jan 2020
Harrogate Convention Centre, Harrogate, United Kingdom
28-30 Jan 2020
Ericsson Exhibition Hall, Ricoh Arena, Coventry, United Kingdom
29-30 Jan 2020
Holiday Inn San Francisco-Golden Gateway, San Francisco, United States
23-25 Mar 2020
Hilton, Barcelona, Spain
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